US sues German bank for being fooled by US

US suing German bank for being fooled by US government

Kommentar auf Deutsch: http://laiglesforum.com/4004-2

http://laiglesforum.com/4004-2

by Don Hank

The US has just sued Deutsche Bank for around $14 billion [over a $3 billion loss, so kind of exaggerated – but the Fed and US are broke and ths is a desperate measure], and this has triggered a crisis that will affect the world economy.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-deutsche-bank-lawsuit-idUSKCN0VC2NY

Deutsche Bank AG must face a U.S. lawsuit seeking to hold it liable for causing $3.1 billion of investor losses by failing to properly monitor 10 trusts backed by toxic residential mortgages, a federal judge ruled on Wednesday.

U.S. District Judge Alison Nathan in Manhattan said Belgium’s Royal Park Investments SA/NV may pursue claims that the trustee Deutsche Bank National Trust Co ignored “widespread” deficiencies in how the underlying loans were underwritten and serviced, and failed to require that bad loans be repurchased.

If you read the entire report linked above you will see that the root cause of the toxic mortgages sold by Deutsche Bank is not mentioned. No Western news outlet will tell you or remind you of why DB had these mortgages on its balance sheet, because, as usual, corruption in the US government kicked this all off. This is not to say that DB is blameless. But it was fraud on the part of US rating agencies Standard  & Poor and Moody’s that led up to this debacle (and caused the financial crisis of 2008). Some of these securities had been bought from the Fed in 2012 as a result of the bailout of AIG. Obviously, these were represented by the Fed as having more value than they actually had. Otherwise, DB would not have bought them. Please read the citations linked to below to learn the background of what happened.

German banks flooded with 75-90 billion euros worth of bad US mortgage-backed derivatives (from focus.de in 2008):

http://www.focus.de/finanzen/boerse/finanzkrise/finanzkrise_aid_267350.html

My translation of opening paragraph:

The Financial market crisis triggered in the US could, according to media reports, cost German credit institutes up to 90 billion euros. [And this was a report from 2008. The toxic derivatives have never been purged from the German system since then and now threaten to bring down Deutsche Bank, one of the biggest banks in Europe!—Don Hank]

ORIGINAL: Die in den USA ausgelöste Finanzmarktkrise könnte die deutschen Kreditinstitute nach Medienberichten mit bis zu 90 Milliarden Euro belasten

 

http://www.zeit.de/wirtschaft/2012-04/deutsche-bank-hypothekenanleihen

April 2012

My translation: Deutsche Bank has purchased a bundle of structured securities [mostly mortgage-backed derivatives] valued in the billions belonging to the one-time world’s biggest insurer AIG [bailed out by the Fed]. The Institute has, together with Barclays, reportedly won a bid for collateralized debt obligations (CDOs), which were dubbed toxic securities in the financial crisis.

ORIGINAL: Die Deutsche Bank hat der US-Notenbank Federal Reserve ein milliardenschweres Paket strukturierter Wertpapiere des einst weltgrößten Versicherers AIG abgekauft. Das Institut habe zusammen mit der britischen Großbank Barclays den Zuschlag für strukturierte Hypothekenpapiere (Collateralized Debt Obligation, CDO), die in der Finanzkrise als Giftpapiere bezeichnet wurden.

 

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-last-mystery-of-the-financial-crisis-20130619

QUOTE

But the financial crisis happened because AAA ratings stopped being something that had to be earned and turned into something that could be paid for. [In other words, these agencies rated these securities as AAA but they could not have really earned that rating because, thanks to the bursting of the housing bubble, many of the lendees were no longer paying because their homes were no longer worth anywhere near the face value of their mortgages—Don Hank].

That this happened is even more amazing because these companies naturally have powerful leverage over their clients, as they are part of a quasi-protected industry that enjoys massive de facto state subsidies. Largely that’s because government agencies like the Securities and Exchange Commission often force private companies to fulfill regulatory requirements by retaining or keeping in reserve certain fixed quantities of assets – bonds, securities, whatever – that have been rated highly by a “Nationally Recognized” ratings agency, like the “Big Three” of Moody’s, S&P and Fitch. So while they’re not quite part of the official regulatory infrastructure, they might as well be. [Yes, and something else: The SEC had to know that these agencies were faking these ratings because they knew about the housing bubble even before it popped. The SEC is equally to blame but no one can sue them, so the government scapegoated the rating agencies that were, de facto, pressured into faking the ratings—Don Hank]

 

Thus you will see that the US is suing DB essentially for something that was set in motion by the above-named US rating agencies, which were allowed to get away with their fraud by the criminally derelict SEC, a government agency responsible for final oversight, independently of rating agencies.

How interesting that so much of the pain in the world is caused by our corrupt government trying desperately to get money by hook or by crook instead of cutting spending by putting people back to work and staying out of other countries’ affairs.

Like a boomerang, you can expect the aftershocks of the German crisis to hit you right square in the pocket book at some future date.

 

 

 

Poll shows one-quarter of world disenchanted with capitalism

BBC survey shows world disenchanted with capitalism

By Don Hank

Soon after last year’s disastrous bank crash, liberals and RINOs were quick to infer, from evidence to which only they seemed to be privy, that the capitalist system was flawed and needed regulation. Even conservatives seemed confused. Oddly, no one could come up with a uniform regulation design that would fix things or prevent such a crash. Something didn’t seem right about their take on the causes.

Not long after that, conservative pundits made an amazing revelation: Starting in the Clinton administration, an old banking law, the Community Reinvestment Act, passed under Carter for the purpose of channeling mortgages to the poor, had been strengthened. As a result, banks had been strong-armed into issuing mortgages to “underserved groups” meaning Hispanics and African Americans. Those that refused were harassed by radical groups like ACORN and/or blacklisted and/or sued by the government. Those that complied were given the highest marks and put into enviable positions from which they could make more money. The shrewdest lenders realized that this was a government-supported racket with which they could enrich themselves at little risk, as long as Fanny and Freddy were willing to back up their seemingly foolhardy lending policies. So they continued the game, and even lenders not subject to the CRA were soon cashing in, realizing that the government actually wanted them to play Russian roulette with public funds. Even when the inevitable crash came, they thought they were protected. Indeed many did get bailouts, but because of the innovative banking practice of bundling, or derivatizing, these mortgages, and then securitizing them – selling them as “securities” like stocks, bonds and mutual funds, the risk was actually multiplied to the point that even the bailouts were no longer a safeguard, because, surprise, even the US government isn’t too big to fail. The banking world on both sides of the pond, moving in lockstep like lemmings, sold and bought such “securities,” many made in the USA but also many homegrown ones, and a global disaster ensued that you are now witnessing, perhaps in person.

I know that many of you are aware of this background of the crash, but there is a whole industry devoted to telling you that this historical fact, authenticated by responsible, sober economists like Thomas Sowell, never happened. This disinformation campaign, supported by the mainstream media and universities, is overwhelming in both its magnitude and its absurdity.

I discovered this firewall of lies and distortions serendipitously while looking for articles on the issue. I had not read or heard anything lately on the causes and had also heard a Keynesian investment advisor on the radio boldly proclaiming that the capitalist system needs regulation to prevent such a crisis from recurring. Over a year ago, Sean Hannity had tried to tackle this issue, but I noticed that his grasp of the facts was a bit slippery. Later, the rest of the pundits also just dropped the ball. In retrospect, it is easy to see why. People are lazy by nature. There are a lot of esoteric concepts and language in this issue and it takes a bit of study. And after all, what’s it matter? We are only talking about your survival (please excuse the sarcasm).

To get to the bottom of this, I typed “cra causes bank crisis” in my search engine and found, compared to the legitimate articles plausibly describing the role of the CRA and government meddling in mortgages, about 20 times more articles either downplaying the role of the CRA and Fanny-Freddy and the strong-arming of banks or actually bold-facedly declaring that the CRA had absolutely nothing to do with the crisis. The gist of each one: capitalism can’t sustain itself without government regulation. We desperately need socialism under a scheme of global governance. Quick, give up your sovereignty and pledge allegiance to the UN before we all die. The truth is that government over-regulation of a toxic kind had threatened the world’s economy and those who were responsible for this outrage were self-righteously preaching to the rest of us that we were somehow the culprits and would now have to submit to their tyranny.

This is the time for conservative pundits to fly into action and defeat this insidious disinformation campaign. It is not new information that is needed, but someone must look at all the rubbish that is being written and start debunking it, because these government induced toxic loans are still ongoing. Right now the FHA has taken over the role of Fanny-Freddy in backing them and is starting to suggest that they too need a bailout. Nothing has changed. The actors are just shifting roles. We are not supposed to pull out of the crisis. It is just going to get worse — with “stimulus” money.

And that will be more evidence that the free market system “needs government control,” quick, before anyone has time to study the issues and recognize what actually hit them.

With the mainstream media and America’s – and Europe’s – professional pseudo-intelligentsia working overtime to show that global capitalism has self-destructed and that the story of the big-bad CRA and of Fanny-Freddy being the fox in the hen house are all part of a vast right-wing conspiracy, it is no wonder that the entire world is tilting to the Left in its thinking on so-called capitalism. As BBC reports (not without a certain unmistakable Schadenfreude), almost a quarter of people surveyed throughout the entire world are now saying that capitalism is fatally flawed.

Yet when you look at these statistics, you see that Americans are among the least deceived. BBC states: “In only two countries, the US and Pakistan, did more than one in five people feel that capitalism works well as it stands.”

I believe this is due to at least 3 phenomena:

1—Americans are smarter than the rest, including the BBC, because they have the commons sense to support the free market,

2–We have pundits like Rush, Savage, Farah, Beck and a whole slew of small but mighty web sites out there, like Laigle’s Forum, unspinning the spin and setting people straight.

But there’s also this I’m afraid:

2—Many Americans haven’t figured out that capitalism is no longer in place here. Many years ago they watched sanguinely as their government propped up a failing Chrysler, naively believing that the government was actually “saving” capitalism and the free market.

What was actually happening was that the stage was being set (BY BOTH PARTIES!) for Obama to come along decades later and deal the free market what was calculated to be its death blow.

There were other steps along the way to what is now being called alternately fascism, corporatism and even communism. Pick your –ism, but don’t call it capitalism, because Adam Smith would not see his ideal embodied in what we call big business in the West today.

Afterword: A reader emailed me that it was good news that 3/4 of the world still believe in capitalism. But if you go to the BBC article linked above, you see that of the 3/4 who still have not given up on capitalism, the majority by far believe the propaganda. They choose the option that capitalism “Has problems that can be addressed through regulation and reform.” A European Christian friend writes that neither capitalism nor communism are good — a conclusion that leaves socialism as the default system. If we lose this one, there will be no powerful conservative in the USA to say “tear down that wall.”

For Christians who think socialism is part of Jesus’ plan, please read the following article:

http://laiglesforum.com/2006/12/11/the-religious-left-in-bible-times-part-1/