Category Archive: taxes

Dec 21

Newsflash: Robin Hood Steals from Himself to Give to the Poor!

The commandment is:  “Thou shalt not steal.” Most people believe that this commandment represents sound morality, even if they are not Christians.  Nonetheless, it seems that this moral precept is forgotten once we start talking politics.  And no wonder:  Americans have been making up ‘right and wrong’ for themselves for quite a while.   Obviously it …

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Jan 20

Do we need a theology of taxation?

We also have to ask about those who are doing the taxing. They obviously believe they have the right to take your resources from you. They must believe that they can obtain some good that you, and perhaps few others, would have subsidized if left to your own devices. They must believe that they know how much they can fairly extract from you. They must believe that they have the right, if you protest, to incarcerate you and take your possessions by force if need be. In sum, they are almost indistinguishable from tyrants.

Christians should not support tyrants or adopt their methods and so become tyrants ourselves. If there is a cause we wish to support, we ought to do so from our own resources out of the free expression of our own hearts (2 Corinthians 8).

Dec 07

Governor Ed Rendell to PA businesses: get out!

PA has new creative ways to get rid of businesses, people First off, let me say the area around Lancaster and York Counties in Pennsylvania is beautiful, crime is low, and you can still safely turn your back on most folks. I love the area. It is in the Bible belt. We may have invented …

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Dec 10

A Medicine Worse than the Sickness

Dorothy Sayers in her essay titled “Problem Picture” presents a perspective of a Christian writing in England during World War Two. I would like to draw a few statements from this essay:

“There is one vast human experience that confronts us so formidably that we cannot pretend to overlook it. There is no solution to death.” … “The spiritual and mental energy that we expend upon resenting the inevitably of death is as much wasted as that which we from time to time have expended on attempts to solve the problem of perpetual motion. Further, this irrational preoccupation curiously hampers us in dealing with such a practical question as that of the possibility of war. It encourages us to look on the evil of war as consisting, first and foremost, that it kills a great many people.” … “Because of that, we would not risk war, for right or justice, or even in the hope of preserving peace. We threw down our arms [after WW1], crying ‘No More War!’, and so delivered up Europe.”

I am also writing from the perspective of a Christian. As I survey the landscape today I believe we can see that the sort of attitude that Sayers decried back in World War 2 is still alive and well with us today. When I hear calls like “Support the Troops- Bring them Home,” I recognize that the speaker believes that the very worst thing that can happen in life is to die. We must ask ourselves how many tyrants are in power today, stifling their populace by whatever means that they have, because free men and women can’t bring themselves to assert their understanding of what is right and what is wrong for fear that war might break out.